NSC LIVE! September 2016

In this month’s NSC LIVE, Nicki LaFoille discussed how to make adjustments to sleeve caps and how to sew a French seam. Nicki also talked about working with all different types of fabric, from faux leather to knit, and sequined to silk. She also answered your question about building a fabric stash and explained how to do both shirring and couching.

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Discussion
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43 Responses to “NSC LIVE! September 2016”
  1. Janice.Long

    I have large upper arms. What is the best way to enlarge this area without making the armhole too big?

    Reply
  2. Sherry

    I hope we will be able to see this again later for reference. Looking forward to this experience!

    Reply
    • Sam Kirchoff

      You will be, Sherry! This live stream is uploaded to the NSC YouTube page as soon as it’s finished, and we also send out a recap e-mail to all Newsletter members a few days after the event – so you’ll have plenty of opportunity to check it out!

      SRK

      Reply
  3. Susan Czerniewski

    Are there any places you can get machine specific lessons to download. Due to a major pipe burst and water leak, insurance upgraded to a ruby deluxe, which intimidates me. I would like a DVD type “class” I can play and replay until I feel more comfortable with the machine.

    Reply
  4. Lisa

    How do you add a partial ruffle at the top of shoulder sleeve (around 2 inches) . How would you measure for extra fabric. This is my own pattern. I be seen it on ready wear clothing.

    Reply
  5. Diann

    If dress pants are too large, where is the one area that you can open and take up the entire pant?

    Reply
  6. Kathy Gorman

    What is a good way to sew straight lines I have sewn for years but still don’t get my lines or seems straight ??

    Reply
  7. Mirline

    Hello! So glad y’all are doing these live Q&As. I noticed we have the same Brother sewing machine – can you talk a bit about the tension knob setting – I’m not sure which is the best setting. Thanks!!

    Reply
  8. Svetlana

    I would like to learn how to fix holes on wool garments(fabric), woven and knit also. Do you have video klasses for that?

    Reply
    • Sherry

      I would like to know how to fix holes in fabrics, also. I was trying to fix a men’s suit that had gotten holes, and everytime I tried to take a stitch, the material frayed more. How do you deal with that?

      Reply
      • Customer Service

        Hi Sherry. When it comes to fixing small holes in fabric- the method you use will depend on the type of fabric you are tying to sew. For example, with cotton, denim or another heavier fabric that doesn’t tend to fray too much while you sew, you can simply align the edges of the hole right sides together and stitch along the raw edge with a straight stitch. If the holes are in a knit or other stretchy fabric you may need to use a serger, a zig zag stitch or an overlock stitch to secure the edges.
        For the suit, I would recommend cutting very thin strips of lightweight, woven, fusible interfacing and applying it to the wrong side of the fabric around the whole. This should keep the fabric from fraying while you try to stitch it. The interfacing is permanent and can just be left in place. Since the strips are small and lightweight they should not get in the way of anything or change the look of the fabric.
        Hope this helps!

        Reply
  9. Jane

    I have narrow shoulders and when I buy a sweatshirt the shoulder seam hangs over my shoulder. How can I make the shoulder fit better so it doesn’t look so sloppy?

    Reply
  10. Donna Ladd

    To enlarge the arm whole, I think it would be best to lower the arm whole by the side seam. This should give a little more room.

    Reply
  11. Lorraine

    How would I change very wide legged pants into bootleg ones? Do I take in both inner and outer seams and from which point doI start the flare?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Lorraine. To do this I would recommend taking in on both the inner and outer seams, especially if the leg is very flared. This will help make it so the seams still stay in the right position on the leg and don’t end up twisting to one side. I would start the seam several inches below the knee. This is where most pants start to flare the most.

      Hope this helps!

      Reply
  12. Janice

    Join the American Sewing Guild if you have a group in your area. You’ll find great new friends and get lots of ideas for projects.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Dolores. I would recommend either searching out an easy block or two you want to try making first, like a four patch or a nine patch to just try out piecing. Once you get familiar with the concept of piecing you can then either search out other beginner/intermediate quilting patterns or start playing around with creating your own. Sometimes learning by creating your own patterns and designs, and making mistakes along the way, is the best way to both learn and remember a new skill.
      Hope this helps!

      Reply