Fabric Frame Design Tips for Your Wall Artwork

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Duration: 16:39

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Creating a fabric frame can be a great way to highlight a certain fabric motif or finish off the edges of a project. Jessica Giardino shows you how to make fun fabric frames for your next sewing project.

Math

This fabric frame technique is fairly quick and easy to sew, however it does require a bit of math. Jessica walks you step-by-step through the math process explaining what to add where and why. By using the same math as she does you can easily figure out what size of backing fabric you need to create your fabric frame depending on the size of fabric you want to place inside the frame. Jessica also explains how the math can be done in reverse if you know what size you want your finished project to be and need to figure out what size of square to cut for inside the frame.

Construction

Once all of the math has been done, Jessica shows you how to start creating the fabric frame for your project. Whether you are making a placemat, trivet, mug rug or other fun home decor sewing project, the technique will be the same. She shows how you first begin by pressing under the raw edges several times to both finish the edges and begin creating the frame shape. From there, Jessica demonstrates how to create a mitered corner look.

Once all of the corners have been stitched the fabric frame can be turned right side out and pressed. Jessica explains that pressing is an important step because it helps to make sure your frame looks the way you want it to before you insert the inner fabric. Depending on what you are making you can then insert the inner fabric, batting or heat resistant batting into the fabric frame and stitch around the inner frame perimeter to secure.