Two Hemming Methods: Slip Stitch and the Blind Hem Stitch

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Duration: 10:53

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Hemming a garment is one of the last finishing touches you can put on a project. ZJ Humbach shows you two different ways to hand sew a hem on a project including the slip stitch, also referred to as the whip stitch and the blind hem stitch.

Tools

For both of these hand sewing hemming methods ZJ explains how to get ready to sew the hem by threading a hand sewing needle. She shows what a good length of thread to use is and even shares a fun fact about why it is the perfect length to use. She then shares several tips that can help make hand sewing easier including how to use the small ‘berry’ on your pincushion to sharpen your needle and how to coat your thread with beeswax to keep if from knotting and tangling while you sew.

Slip Stitch

The first hand hemming method ZJ demonstrates is the slip stitch, which is sometimes referred to as a whip stitch. She shows how to begin by first having your hem pressed under and ready to be sewn. From there she shows how to secure the thread at the edge of the hem with several knot options and then begins the stitch. While demonstrating how to do the slip stitch method she gives tips on how to keep your stitches even and consistent and how to make sure that your thread is nearly invisible on the right side of the project.

Blind Hem Stitch

Then next hand hemming stitch she demonstrates is a blind hem stitch. From the outside of the garment it looks just like the slip stitch. She shows how it differs on the inside of the garment by explaining how to hide the thread within the fold of the hem so it isn’t seen. For more tips on how to blind hem, see how it can also be done using a sewing machine.