Using a Serger to Sew a Simple Fitted Sheet

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Duration: 9:30

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Fitted sheets can get expensive to buy, especially if they’re made from a luxurious fabric like Minky. Watch as Ellen March takes you through the steps of how to make your own. Learn what size mattress this project works best with and why, how to take the right measurements and how to construct the sheet. You’ll learn which stitch to use on your serger, as well as how to sew the same sheet on a conventional machine. Ellen will explain how easy it can be to add elastic to the sheet, or any other project, using a 4-thread overlock stitch on the serger. It’s so easy you don’t even have to measure your elastic! You’ll also learn some tricks to keeping your sewing space free from raveling bits of fabric. Follow along as Ellen stitches up a small sample-size sheet, allowing you to see they whole project at one time!

Sergers can be intimidating if you’ve never used one before, but once you try one you’ll want to use it for everything! As mentioned in the video, this project uses the 4-thread overlock stitch. This is the most common stitch and the one you’ll most likely use if you’re just starting out. It is the strongest stitch and can be used on anything from clothing to home décor. This stitch is also great for finishing fabric edges before, during, and after sewing. If you are working with a fabric like Minky or terry cloth that ravels when it’s cut, serge the fabric edges before stitching the pieces together to keep your sewing space clean. You can also serge seams as you work your way through a project, or wait and do them all at the end. Using a serger to finish a seam is quick and easy, and can have less bulk than other finishing methods.